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officials today. and president obama talked of a transition that begins now. he spoke after meeting with canadian prime minister stephen harper at the white house. >> i believe that president mubarak care bses history country, he is crowd but he is also a patriot. and what i have suggested to him is that he needs to consult with those who are around him in his government. he needs to listen to what's being voiced by the egyptian people. and make a judgement about a pathway forward that is orderly. but that is meaningful and serious can. and i believe that he's already said that he's to the going to run for re-election. this is somebody whose's been in power for a very long time in egypt. having made that psychological break, that decision that he will not be running again, i think the most important for him to ask himself, for the egyptian government to ask itself as well as the opposition to ask itself is how do we make that transition effective, and lasting and legitimate. and as i said before, that's not a decision ultimately the united states makes or any country outside of egyp
. president obama made the case today for his 2012 budget, and called on both parties to prepare for tough decisions about social security, medicare and medicaid. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, on capitol hill, republicans called for slashing this year's spending. david chalian walks us through the politics of today's debate. >> woodruff: and we talk to freshman senator and tea party leader rand paul, who says neither party is going far enough. >> i don't think we're on a path towards balancing the budget. we're not a path towards reducing the debt. we're on a path towards exploding the debt on both sides, democrat and republican. >> ifill: then, we look at the ripple effect from egypt's uprising, as protesters take to the streets in bahrain and yemen. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown zeroes in on the moves by the government of iran to crack down on demonstrators. >> ifill: betty ann bowser tells the story of a colorado clinic helping diabetes patients stave off the devastating consequences of the disease. >> we're winning the war because we see less long-term complicatio
of negotiations aimed at ending the uprising. >> brown: then we look at president obama's outreach to corporate america in a speech to the u.s. chamber of commerce. >> but i want to be clear. even as we make america the best place on earth to do business, businesses also have a responsibility to america. >> ifill: judy woodruff talks to actress and playwright anna deveare smith about her one- woman play on facing the end of life. >> i say that it is about the vulnerability of the human body, the resilience of the spirit, the price of care. >> brown: and we examine aol's big buy of the web site the huffington post, with arianna huffington and aol chief tim armstrong. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? your financial prof
of the house. president obama called his first formal news conference of the year to address the issue. for the second day in a row, the president spoke up for his new $3.7 trillion budget blueprint for 2012. the plan does not include the sweeping recommendations of his deficit commission. instead, he calls for negotiating "tough choices" with republicans. >> my goal here is to actually solve the problem. it's not to get a... a good headline on the first day. my goal is... is that, a year from now or two years from now, people will look back and say, "you know what? we actually started making progress on this issue." >> woodruff: the obama budget projects a record deficit of more than $1.6 trillion this year. the red ink would top $7 trillion over the next ten years. the plan relies on a partial freeze on domestic programs, some tax increases, and reduced war spending to keep the deficit from being even larger. the president said he feels the pain those measures would cause, but expressed optimism about getting a deal that's good for the country. >> my hope is that what's different thi
. >> woodruff: in washington, president obama got the news about mubarak as he was having a meeting in the oval office. later, he emerged to say egyptians have inspired the world with the moral force of non-violence and peaceful change. >> the people of egypt have spoken. their voices have been heard and egypt will never be the same. by stepping down president mubarak responded to the egyptian people's hunger for change. but this is not the end of egypt's transition. it's the beginning. i'm sure there will be difficult days ahead. and many questions remain unanswered. but i am confident that the people of egypt can find the answers. the word tahrir means liberation. it is a word that speaks to that something in our souls that cries out for freedom. and forever more it will remind us of the egyptian people, of what they did, of the things that they stood for, and how they changed their country and in doing so, changed the world. >> lehrer: the joyful scenes in egypt quickly spread across the middle east and around the world. in beirut, lebanon, and in gaza, people poured into the streets, singin
in silicon valley is innovation. and that's what brought president obama to these parts. >> lehrer: and kwame holman details the tug-of-war in congress today over spending cuts. >> woodruff: plus, mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work an a big scale. i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. and by toyota. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoin
president obama's endorsement of a plan allowing states to opt out of health care reform. >> woodruff: and we report on how political satire in the vein of the "daily show" became a hit on iranian television. >> a lot of people have come here from the opposition groups and they watch the show. now if they choose to change their mind and see things a little bit differently, that's up to them. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> blooet in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? your financial professional can tell you about pacific life, the power to help you succeed. >> you can't manufacture pride. but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota all across america. >> chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by b
president obama sided with the state workers. >> some of what i've heard coming out of wisconsin, where you're just making it harder for public employees to collectively bargain generally, seems like more of an assault on unions. >> woodruff: speaker of the house john boehner took issue, saying: >> if the president truly wants an adult conversation about our fiscal challenges, shouting down reform-minded leaders is a bad way to start. call off the attacks and lead, mr. president." the fight is being joined in other states, where republicans are also trying to lower employee benefits. protests are planned in coming days in ohio, indiana, missouri, new jersey, and pennsylvania. more than 20 state legislatures are considering benefit cuts. we get two views now on the issues being debated in wisconsin and elsewhere. randi weingarten is president of the american federation of teachers, one of the unions protesting in wisconsin. she was in madison last night. and jonathan williams is the director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the american legislative exchange council, which represen
might face deeper spending cuts. in washington, president obama defended public workers at a meeting of the nation's governors. >> i don't think it does anybody any good when public employees are denigrated, vilified, or their rights are infringed upon. we need to attract the best and the brightest to public service. these times demand it. >> sreenivasan: governor walker has said he will start laying off state workers in wisconsin within days if his bill is not passed. in economic news, consumer incomes rose in january by the most in nearly two years, thanks to a cut in social security taxes. but the commerce department said consumer spending managed only a small gain. wall street rallied today amid signs that oil prices have stabilized. the dow jones industrial average gained nearly 96 points to close at 12,226. the nasdaq rose one point to close at 2782. former opposition parties in ireland have begun talks on forming a new coalition government. they swept to huge wins in friday's national election, fueled by voter anger over ireland's financial collapse. the leader of the main cen
yearned for a role in shaping the future of syria. she asked president barack obama to do more to support the palestinian cause. this is another side ofofhe crackdown on opposition in syria. >> and big debt problems in communities across germany. the debt has risen dramatically. despite an economic rebound, and german towns and cities broad anfar wer revenu las year and then they spent. it rose to nearly 10 billion euros, the largest in post-war history. >> like many other cities in germany, frankfurt is struggling to make ends meet. the economy is booming but spending is on the rise. basic social costs are a heavy burden. >> let's take a look at my city. our basic social spending was 19 million euros in 2010. it was 27.5 million euros in 2005. >> off and cultural services are the first to go. >> in recent yearswe had to close theaters. there even discussion about closing the museum. so the cost-cutting measures are getting tougher. municipalities are raisingq locl fees to increase revenues. and even the dogs tax is set to increase. there is a summary from the frankfurt stock exexange. f
to a screeching halt. >> woodruff: in washington today, president obama sat down with a number of democratic governors, who later commented on the government versus union battles across the nation. >> whatever wisconsin or these other states can do to get back into the game of creating jobs instead of fighting or belittling their public employees i think is a good step. >> woodruff: the governors will remain in washington through the weekend. and joining us now to discuss the current disputes over public employees and fiscal challenges sweeping the states, republican governor mitch daniels of indiana and democratic governor brian schweitzer of montana. gentlemen, thank you both for being with us. and i just want to point out the sling, governor daniels, is not because he's been in a tussle with democrats, you had shoulder surgery recently. >> it's a sympathy ploy, i thought you might take it easy on me. >> woodruff: governor, let me begin with you on this showdown in wisconsin and your state of indiana. you've been very critical of public workers, you use the term privileged elite. you've sa
, and our relationship with him. so i think, you know, we're walking... i think the obama administration has it correct here. i think they understand from the get-go they've understood exactly what our goals are. wu we also have other interests. we need to be sensitive to them. egypt was a critical player in the peace process of the middle east. we don't want a catastrophic failure of prevention on the gaza strip and on the border with egypt. we don't want radical movement of one kind or another to fill any vacuum. we don't want to send a message to friends that we don't understand those kinds of sensitivities. so i think the key here has been to make clear that we understand and are sympathetic to and supportive of the aspirations of the people of egypt, that we know there's a need for change. but to make it responsible change. change that can be affected with accountability and transparency and ultimately hopefully with an outcome that permits the aspirations the people are expressing in the street to actually be fulfilled, to be worked on, to be advanced. that's the key here. and it's a t
obama submitted a $3.7 trillion budget for fiscal year 2012. it shrinks some government programs while increasing spending on others. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we talk to white house budget director jack lew and ohio republican senator rob portman about cuts, taxes, and the political battles ahead. >> ifill: then, margaret warner, just back from cairo, helps us look at the role social media and mainstream media played in the egypt uprising. >> brown: and we report on a battle that pits human champions against a machine. our science correspondent took the challenge. >> i'm miles o'brien. i just played jeopardy against a very smart computer. it was great for the computer. i'll tell you about artificial intelligence and the pursuit of language understanding. for machines. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as markets have been lately having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama kicked off what is shaping up to be a pitched battle over the budget today. but emboldened republicans are kicking back. ray suarez begins our coverage. >> suarez: the president's annual budget blueprint arrived on capitol hill this morning. the price tag: $3.73 trillion. and a record $1.6 trillion deficit, the highest dollar amount ever. mr. obama touted his plan today at a school outside baltimore. >> the only way to truly tackle our deficit is to cut excessive spending wherever we find it. in domestic spending, defense spending, health care spending and spending through tax breaks and loopholes. so what we've done here is make a downpayment, but there's going to be more work that needs to be done. >> suarez: under the proposed budget the deficit would drop to under $1.1 trillion next year with some dramatic cuts. among the items on the chopping block, some programs popular with democrats including community development block grants which help fund low-income housing and anti-poverty programs. they'd be cut by $
's protests. and in a speech, supreme leader ayatollah ali khamenei rejected president obama's criticism of iran for using force against protesters. >> ( translated ): america can bully a country as long as the people are not standing up for it. the governments do not know that people come to power or leave power because of the u.s. one day america supports him and another day gives up support for him and he has to leave. >> woodruff: and across the persian gulf from iran, demands grew for sweeping change in bahrain. huge crowds of protesters demonstrated again in the island kingdom, home to the u.s. fifth fleet. majority shiites filled the main square in the country's capital. there were mounting cries to remove the sunni monarchy that's ruled for 200 years. u.s. officials maintained a cautious approach. a spokesman for the fifth fleet said that so far the protests have not targeted the u.s. navy's presence. for more on what's happening in bahrain, we turn to margaret warner. >> warner: why has this tiny gulf nation of one million become the latest scene of protests on the tunisia-egypt
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)

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